Calls for Manuscripts

Upcoming Language Arts Themes

September 2019 Engaging Families in Language Arts Learning: Deadline Sept. 15, 2018
November 2019 Viewpoints and Visions: Deadline Nov. 15, 2018
January 2020 Multimodal Literacies: Deadline Jan. 15, 2019
March 2020 Readers, Reading, and Responding: Deadline Mar. 15, 2019
May 2020 Teacher Learning and the Language Arts: Deadline May 15, 2019
July 2020 Viewpoints and Visions: Deadline July 15, 2019

September 2019 Engaging Families in Language Arts Learning
For this issue, we seek Feature Article and Perspectives on Practice submissions that explore the participation of families in language and literacy learning. How are definitions of families changing, and in what ways does this impact our understandings of family engagement in literacy learning? What is “family literacy” and how might it be viewed differently by parents, guardians, teachers, schools, and librarians? How can teachers, schools, and librarians reach out to all families in new and different ways while drawing on their “funds of knowledge” to support and enhance their children’s language arts learning? What roles can families play in supporting their children’s literacy learning? For instance, seminal studies of early readers demonstrated the significance of families and the home environment in helping young children learn to read before entering school without having had any formal instruction. What recent studies build upon this scholarship? How are family literacy practices evolving in the digital era in which we live? Should family literacy programs support language arts learning for family members and children simultaneously? What theoretical frameworks attuned to racial and linguistic diversity, asset-based pedagogies, and social class can help us envision more culturally responsive family literacy engagements and programs? Are there particular literacy practices teachers have implemented (e.g., writing suitcases and collecting family stories) that lead to increased engagement with the language arts for children and their families? Join us in putting together an issue that will give us much to consider in regard to engaging families in language arts learning. Submission deadline: September 15, 2018

November 2019 Viewpoints and Visions
For this unthemed issue, we invite Feature Article and Perspectives on Practice submissions that offer a variety of viewpoints and visions related to language arts across multiple settings and modalities. What topics, concerns, or issues do you think are important to today’s readers of Language Arts? What kinds of theoretical lenses have you applied to your inquiry work to increase our collective understandings of language arts instruction? How does your research illustrate the range of ways in which young people are engaged with the language arts? What trends do you see in the field of language arts? What innovative literacy practices do you see in the diverse spaces of classrooms and community settings? Within a digital age, how are our understandings of children’s literature, writing instruction, and literacy learning shifting? These are just a few of the many questions that can be explored in this issue. Join us in crafting an assortment of articles that helps to expand our viewpoints and visions about language arts. Submission deadline: November 15, 2018

January 2020 Multimodal Literacies
In 2005, NCTE framed its “Position Statement on Multimodal Literacies” with a question from William Kist, asking, “Has there ever been a time when we have not been awash in a remarkable torrent of symbols and opportunities for reading and writing them?” More than a decade later, teachers, researchers, librarians, and policymakers are continuing to grapple with expanding definitions and practices of multimodal literacies. Across PreK-8 classrooms and in community-based programs, we see incorporation of the arts, music, and drama into literacy education as well as expanding definitions of texts to include the written, digital, visual, and the embodied.  As children navigate multiple modes (visual, aural, gestural, etc.) across an increasingly diverse set of digital and social media platforms, many teachers have created educational contexts responsive to the range and variation of children’s multimodal literacies.  In this issue, we invite Feature Articles and Perspectives on Practice submissions that explore multimodal literacies. Some questions you might consider include: How are you incorporating multimodalities into your teaching? What are you noticing about how young people read multimodal texts (e.g., picturebooks, graphic novels, e-books) and create multimodal texts (e.g., podcasts, comics, digital stories)? In what ways are you assessing students’ multimodal compositions? How are you striving to capture and represent the complexities of multimodal literacies within your research?  What are promising theoretical frameworks that we can draw on to understand and illuminate children’s multimodal composing processes? In what ways can multimodal literacies help advance equity-oriented and social justice pedagogies?  Join us as we craft an issue responsive to and reflective of the multimodal nature of literacy
Due: January 15, 2019

March 2020 Readers, Reading, and Responding
For this issue we seek Feature Article and Perspectives on Practice submissions that explore the nuances, complexities, and practices of children responding to a range of print, multimodal, and digital texts. We ask you to consider whether and how modes of response have remained the same or developed in the many years since foundational reader response theorists such as Louise Rosenblatt, Richard Beach, Lawrence Sipe, and Judith Langer encouraged teachers to value readers/texts/contexts (albeit across a continuum) while fostering literary understandings? What current pedagogies, theories, and studies build upon or complicate this earlier reader -response criticism? Some questions you might consider include: How do teachers, reading specialists, literacy coaches, and librarians decide the importance of responding to texts in their classrooms or other teaching contexts? What are you noticing about features or genres of diverse series and/or multimodal texts that evoke certain kinds of responses in readers? In what ways have educators considered or negotiated tensions between asking students to engage in ‘close readings’ versus interpreting texts from experiential, cultural, social, or other stances and positionalities? What emerging theories of response incorporate the intersectional nature of student characteristics of race/ethnicity, class, gender, development, geography, etc. within the meaning-making process? Beyond reading and writing, how are the arts, music, dance, drama or other modalities viewed as ways of responding in classrooms and other out-of-school spaces? How might studies of response help us to better understand or advance children’s racial literacy, critical literacy, agency, introspection, and awareness of social justice? Join us in putting together an issue that will give us much to consider in regard to broadening our understandings of the many ways youth respond to texts. Due: March 15, 2019

May 2020 Teacher Learning and the Language Arts
Teaching the language arts in PreK–8 settings can often be challenging for novice and veteran teachers alike and requires ongoing professional learning. For this themed issue, we invite Feature Article and Perspectives on Practice submissions that address teacher learning and the language arts across a continuum. Some questions to consider might be: what do highly effective language arts teachers look like and what can others learn from their everyday classroom practices? In what ways do teacher beliefs, identities, and ways of knowing contribute to the successful implementation of language arts instruction? What kinds of texts, communities, or practices support teachers’ learning? Where are teachers finding inspiration and resources for ongoing growth in the profession? What can be done to ensure that educators are successful in teaching the language arts to students who are often marginalized in schools due to factors such as race, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, etc.? Students often inspire new lines of inquiry into our teaching practice. Are there particular students or problems of practice that have catalyzed teachers’ learning trajectories? How can teacher education programs prepare preservice teachers to become highly effective teachers of reading and writing and how can this work be sustained when preservice teachers become inservice teachers? What accounts for teacher development and adaptation throughout the trajectory of a teaching career? What types of professional learning groups and contexts help to sustain and further develop growth in teacher practices? How are teachers engaging in inquiry related to the language arts to improve their pedagogy and what kinds of insights does this inquiry provide? Join us in putting together an issue that will give us much to contemplate about teacher learning and the language arts. Submission deadline: May 15, 2019

July 2020 Viewpoints and Visions
For this unthemed issue, we invite Feature Article and Perspectives on Practice submissions that offer a variety of viewpoints and visions related to language arts across multiple settings and modalities. What topics, concerns, or issues do you think are important to today’s readers of Language Arts? What kinds of theoretical lenses have you applied to your inquiry work to increase our collective understandings of language arts instruction? How does your research illustrate the range of ways in which young people are engaged with the language arts? What trends do you see in the field of language arts? What innovative literacy practices do you see in the diverse spaces of classrooms and community settings? Within a digital age, how are our understandings of children’s literature, writing instruction, and literacy learning shifting? These are just a few of the many questions that can be explored in this issue. Join us in crafting an assortment of articles that helps to expand our viewpoints and visions about language arts. Submission deadline: July 15, 2019