Calls for Manuscripts

Upcoming Language Arts Themes

May 2020 Teacher Learning and the Language Arts: Deadline May 15, 2019
July 2020 Viewpoints and Visions: Deadline July 15, 2019
September 2020 Teaching in Troubling Times: Deadline Sept. 15, 2019
November 2020 Viewpoints and Visions: Deadline Nov. 15, 2019
January 2021 Multiple Identities, Intersectionality, & Literacy: Deadline Jan. 15, 2020
March 2021 Equity and the Language Arts: Deadline Mar. 15, 2020
May 2021 The Promise of Picturebooks: Deadline May 15, 2020

May 2020 Teacher Learning and the Language Arts
Teaching the language arts in PreK–8 settings can often be challenging for novice and veteran teachers alike and requires ongoing professional learning. For this themed issue, we invite Feature Article and Perspectives on Practice submissions that address teacher learning and the language arts across a continuum. Some questions to consider might be: what do highly effective language arts teachers look like and what can others learn from their everyday classroom practices? In what ways do teacher beliefs, identities, and ways of knowing contribute to the successful implementation of language arts instruction? What kinds of texts, communities, or practices support teachers’ learning? Where are teachers finding inspiration and resources for ongoing growth in the profession? What can be done to ensure that educators are successful in teaching the language arts to students who are often marginalized in schools due to factors such as race, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, etc.? Students often inspire new lines of inquiry into our teaching practice. Are there particular students or problems of practice that have catalyzed teachers’ learning trajectories? How can teacher education programs prepare preservice teachers to become highly effective teachers of reading and writing and how can this work be sustained when preservice teachers become inservice teachers? What accounts for teacher development and adaptation throughout the trajectory of a teaching career? What types of professional learning groups and contexts help to sustain and further develop growth in teacher practices? How are teachers engaging in inquiry related to the language arts to improve their pedagogy and what kinds of insights does this inquiry provide? Join us in putting together an issue that will give us much to contemplate about teacher learning and the language arts. Submission deadline: May 15, 2019

July 2020 Viewpoints and Visions
For this unthemed issue, we invite Feature Article and Perspectives on Practice submissions that offer a variety of viewpoints and visions related to language arts across multiple settings and modalities. What topics, concerns, or issues do you think are important to today’s readers of Language Arts? What kinds of theoretical lenses have you applied to your inquiry work to increase our collective understandings of language arts instruction? How does your research illustrate the range of ways in which young people are engaged with the language arts? What trends do you see in the field of language arts? What innovative literacy practices do you see in the diverse spaces of classrooms and community settings? Within a digital age, how are our understandings of children’s literature, writing instruction, and literacy learning shifting? These are just a few of the many questions that can be explored in this issue. Join us in crafting an assortment of articles that helps to expand our viewpoints and visions about language arts. Submission deadline: July 15, 2019

September 2020 Teaching in Troubling Times
With increasing frequency, educators have witnessed acts of violence play out across media outlets, heard anti-immigrant discourses and name-calling, and watched as their students come to class managing waves of social anxiety created by living through troubling times. At the same time, young people are leveraging literacy practices in response to injustices, raising their voices and organizing to make change. In a riveting speech at the 2018 March for Our Lives rally, 11-year-old Naomi Wilder called for the end of gun violence in schools and communities. Tween Marley Dias started the #1000BlackGirlBooks movement to diversify book lists. Within this issue, we seek manuscripts that explore how we can use literacy to teach about social injustices, even as we also foster hope for a more equitable future. What are your students teaching you about navigating these troubling times? How are young people engaging in social activism and drawing on community-based assets to document and respond to troubling times and experiences across platforms (e.g., blogs, community newspapers)? What texts, multimodal literacies, and instructional practices support young people in engaging in civically minded discourse and the responsibilities of citizenship? What roles can language arts educators play in helping students appreciate multiple perspectives and bridge ideological, linguistic, racial, gender, and social class divides? How are teachers moving students forward academically while also being responsive to the emotional dimensions of teaching and learning? Some educators may also find certain educational currents troubling. How are teachers responding to increasing demands related to testing, standardized curricula, censorship, and silencing of student and teacher voices? How are teachers engaging in literacy practices to persevere through difficult times? Join us as we construct an issue responsive to troubling times and to children creating hopeful visions of the future. Submission deadline: September 15, 2019

November 2020 Viewpoints and Visions
For this unthemed issue, we invite Feature Article and Perspectives on Practice submissions that offer a variety of viewpoints and visions related to language arts across multiple settings and modalities. What topics, concerns, or issues do you think are important to today’s readers of Language Arts? What kinds of theoretical lenses have you applied to your inquiry work to increase our collective understandings of language arts instruction? How does your research illustrate the range of ways in which young people are engaged with the language arts? What trends do you see in the field of language arts? What innovative literacy practices do you see in the diverse spaces of classrooms and community settings? Within a digital age, how are our understandings of children’s literature, writing instruction, and literacy learning shifting? These are just a few of the many questions that can be explored in this issue. Join us in crafting an assortment of articles that helps to expand our viewpoints and visions about language arts. Submission deadline: Nov. 15, 2019

January 2021 Multiple Identities, Intersectionality, and Literacy
Within this issue, we seek Feature Article and Perspectives on Practice submissions that explore how educators draw on and cultivate the multiple and fluid identities held by youth as they engage in language and literacy practices. These include identities marked by race, gender, ethnicity, ability, social class, religion, sexuality, and other markers. Some questions you might pose are: What and how are students’ identities expressed and valued in your language arts classroom? What roles can language arts educators play in helping students embrace the identities they hold as well as those held by others? How are young people using the language arts to navigate their identities in school, on social media, and in out-of-school spaces? We also seek insights into the ways Kimberlé Crenshaw’s concept of “intersectionality”—which addresses the cumulative effect of multiple identities and highlights interlocking systems of oppression—might inform language and literacy curricula. For example, if we build on and expand Crenshaw’s ideas, what instructional practices, texts, and other material selections help to illuminate or critique the marginalization experienced by certain groups with intersecting identities (e.g., Black and Brown girls or boys, Muslim and Arab youth, or those who identify as LGBTQ and persons of color)? How might literacy instruction that foregrounds intersectionality help to blur divisions among the variety of groups represented in your classrooms, schools, or districts? Finally, what are some of the theoretical, practical, or research-based potentialities and challenges of recognizing identities and their intersections? Join us in putting together a collection of articles that nuance and broaden our thinking about multiple identities, intersectionality, and literacy.
Submission deadline: Jan. 15. 2020

March 2021 Equity and the Language Arts
For this issue, we seek Feature Article and Perspectives on Practice submissions that explore the myriad ways educators can provide more equitable language arts instruction for youth. Some questions to consider are: How might language arts educators take on equity-oriented teaching and recognize and intervene concerning bias in curricula and practices such as tracking, scripted curricula, and over emphasis on test preparation instead of authentic literacy learning? What are the challenges of providing differentiated literacy instruction (e.g., guided reading) while not marginalizing particular groups of students? What role does critical self-reflection around issues of bias related to cultural phenomena such as racism, homophobia, poverty, and ableism play in equity and the language arts? How can issues of social justice be embedded in language arts instruction with children as well as with preservice teachers to help them read the word and the world? How might language arts educators design classroom learning environments that are safe, welcoming, and inclusive for all students? For example, what role might diverse children’s literature that speaks to students across various racial and social groups play in this effort? Join us in crafting an assortment of articles that helps to expand our understandings related to equity and the language arts.
Submission deadline: Mar. 15, 2020

May 2021 The Promise of Picturebooks For this issue we seek Feature Article and Perspectives on Practice submissions that explore the promise of picturebooks. Some of the many questions to consider are: How have picturebooks evolved over time? In what ways can picturebooks be used to teach children about art and art history? What kinds of instructional techniques can teachers use to help children learn the language of picturebooks (e.g., endpages, gutters, borders, dust jackets, etc.) and support them in learning to look closely at art? How do teachers conduct illustrator studies of notable picturebook creators such as Donald Crews, Laura Vaccaro Seeger, Yuyi Morales, Christian Robinson, Jason Chin, Ekua Holmes, Melissa Sweet, Jerry Pinkney, and Leo Lionni. What are the ways that picturebooks can serve as mentor texts for youth to create their own work? How can picturebooks be used with students in middle school settings? How have new technologies such as e-readers and picturebook apps shaped the early literacy experiences of young children? How have teachers incorporated picturebooks into the classroom to invite conversations about complex topics and difficult histories? Join us in putting together an issue that will give us much to consider in regard to the promise of picturebooks.
Submission deadline: May. 15, 2020