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This Year’s National Day on Writing: Unstoppable

poetrypensOctober 20 is NCTE’s National Day on Writing. This year, we asked you to tell us why you write—and you did. Twitter recorded more than 60,000 tweets with the hashtag #WhyIWrite, and Twitter wasn’t the only place where people shared why they love this art form. We posed the question to select NCTE members, and these were among the responses:

 I write because one day it will be the only proof that I existed.

—Shekema H. Silveri

I’ve been writing since I was a kid—because it was fun and because I just HAD to.  I don’t mean that anyone told me I had to—I was itchy with poems and stories I needed to put down with pen on paper. Now I’m an adult and I still feel that way (and, believe it or not, I’m still mostly using pen and paper)!

—Marilyn Singer

 I write to make meaning and leaps into the known and unknown. I tell my students they’re sentence-makers on a mission with hope and for change.

—R. Joseph Rodríguez

I write to organize my work life, to share information with others, to make sense of my experiences, to compensate for my aging memory, to immortalize a moment of wonder, to work through sorrow or pain, to connect with a friend, to share my love.

—Debi Goodman

 I write to articulate my thinking about how children learn. I always discover new things when I write about the classroom.

—Franki Sibberson

I write because I get tired of staring in silence when inequities loom loudly and compound, giving massive voice to age-old and newborn injustices. Writing evokes more than any other thing a too often fought-for reality that I must struggle to preserve: that I too am human.

—David E. Kirkland

I write because I want to tell funny stories that make people laugh. I also write because I love drawing the pictures that go with the words.

—Cece Bell

And from a podcast on the subject, a 6th grade student offers, “I write because if I didn’t, it would be like a sunrise with no sun.”

Comment below to tell us why you write.